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  • Nathira Salim

C1

I had my first round of chemo yesterday.

Well by the time this post hits your mail box, it would have been weeks before.


I actually typed out a couple of paragraphs. about chemo and why I detest it and all. Then I realised it was too technical. Lets just talk about how it went. First of all - I have not been looking forward to it at all. The thought of having toxic chemicals going into my innocent blood veins, and having my good blood cells along with my cancer cells to be killed was mentally killing me. I had this thought that the nurses were going to come to me with you know the hazard gear and all and inject me with nuclear chemicals. Thats the only picture I had the whole time since last week.


I even met up with all my friends for a final farewell as if I was going to die.


The day of the chemo came. I had a call from the nurse to come in at 1pm instead of 3.30opm because they failed to take a particular blood test. I was to come in at 1pm, get the blood work done, then go for lunch and then come back in for chemo.


I did all that. By the time I went up for chemo - I had to check in, and register. From that moment on, I could not talk. All I could do was nod my head to whatever questions was being asked.


For first time chemo - the process was to have the blood work done to know the level of white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Its more like a baseline to the upcoming blood work before every chemo to know if my blood levels are down before and every day. If its down, they could change the dose of the drugs.


So I was told that I will be given a token before going into the room. I was to keep that token next to me, if I lose it, I will have to pay $150 or something. When they talk numbers, my brain goes on a overdrive. I remember only nodding. Hubby can only follow me for the first chemo and for the remaining consecutive chemos I would have to be alone. So when my time came up, I walked to the room, and was directed to the end of the room. Two nurses came over to me, gave me some set of instructions and then left.


It was one sort of feeling. There were many cubicles with recliner like sofa. There was an Indian uncle having his chemo opposite to mine. And since there were many patients the entire ward was noisy especially with the nurses. Hubby had a hard time listening to the pharmacist's advise on the side effects that he was going on about. So after the pharmacist left, the nurses places the port on my veins. The flow was as follows: flush my system with saline water, then in goes the Docxorubin ( the chemo drug - which was blood red in color) flush with more saline, pump in the 2nd chemo drug ( a colourless liquid) and then flush with more saline and then I am out of the room. It took place within the hour.


I didn't expect anything odd from the first drug. But for the 2nd, I felt as if I was dunked in water a bit. That kind of sensation in my brains - I think water flow. Anyway that's chemo cycle 1 for you guys. Will follow up with the side effects later on.


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